BC political parties ponder common issues after close vote, possible deals

  • BC political parties ponder common issues after close vote, possible deals

BC political parties ponder common issues after close vote, possible deals

Meanwhile, the shock of the night came from the Green party which won three seats and now holds the balance of power in the 87-seat legislature. Both the NDP and Green participants voiced their opposition during the province's recent Clean Energy and Climate debate. At least 5 fewer Liberals will take a seat in the legislature and the party's share of the vote dropped almost 4% province wide.But not all Liberals suffered a drop in popularity.

Johnston said if the results remain a Liberal minority government with the Greens holding the balance of power, Weaver has to be careful.

Hoberg said, "LNG project approvals would be easier for the province to unilaterally reverse", compared with federally approved pipelines.

Ideally, I wanted to take a break from talking about the election but there's been far too much speculation out there in the press -- partly from the media party, partly from progressives dying to chime in and pressure the Greens and NDP into a coalition, and partly from far too pessimistic BC Liberal and conservative voters. But Weaver has also hinted that on economic issues his party sides with the Liberals.

The NDP won one riding by only nine votes, making a recount a certainty that will determine the difference between a minority and majority if it were to flip to the Liberals. That race is expected to go to a judicial recount.

There were approximately 51,000 absentee ballots in the 2013 election, and Elections BC will make its final count of this year's ballots between May 22 and 24.

Liberal leader Christy Clark said she intends to form the next government.

"We're starting negotiations tomorrow", said Green Party Leader Andrew Weaver, calling the election "a historic day for British Columbia". "And with absentee ballots still to be counted I am confident they will strengthen our margin of victory".

Even if the count remains as is with a Liberal minority government, it won't last long.

"It is my intention to continue to lead British Columbia's government", Clark, 51, told supporters in downtown Vancouver.

The unwritten conventions of Westminster parliamentary democracy grant the previous government a chance to face the new legislature, regardless of how many seats it commands. "If they think voters voted for "change" and "not Christy Clark" they might want to support the NDP and not anger voters".

We don't know yet how that will work out. "I'm 35 and I ran for this party for the future and the children, and my yet to be conceived children, so I'm still hoping that we pull through".

NDP leader John Horgan urged supporters to hang tight, noting the votes have not all been counted yet.

Horgan said Tuesday that a majority of British Columbians voted for a new government and that needs to be considered.

He wouldn't say whether he thought the pipeline's prospects of being built were put at risk by the B.C. election results.

Both leaders are in communication with Weaver. "In the days ahead there will be discussions taking place between all parties, but [tonight] is not the time, [tonight] is the time for Greens to celebrate".

Complete results for all of the ridings are available here.

But they will probably win 43 seats in the B.C. legislature, down from 47 when the election was called.

The 2017 provincial election will be remembered as a great night for the BC Green Party.

But Clark had a different interpretation, saying she reads the results as a plea to the major parties to work together more effectively.