Hurricane Harvey pushes gasoline prices to the highest level since 2015

  • Hurricane Harvey pushes gasoline prices to the highest level since 2015

Hurricane Harvey pushes gasoline prices to the highest level since 2015

Gas prices in the region are up nearly 20 cents from this time last week, CBS Dallas-Fort Worth reported.

Gas prices have spiked across the country, and Virginians are starting to see the impact of Harvey as Labor Day approaches. DeHaan also said the rising prices could last from two weeks to a month. Now it's nearly $2.50 in some spots.

For the rest of Texas that went untouched by the storm, it's becoming apparent that gas is increasingly hard to find.

Several major oil refineries were forced to shut down due to the flooding, putting a strain on supply which resulted in higher prices at gas pumps. The average price of premium gasoline is now $2.93 a gallon, up almost three cents over the same period.

"I hear that further on down it's a drastic increase in gas prices", says Gloria Jennings, cashier.

Since Hurricane Harvey first made land fall last Thursday, the Houston-area average per-gallon gas price has risen roughly 5 cents, according to Gas Buddy. But Craddick says there is no need for Texans to constantly "top off" their gas tanks.

Although some experts have estimated that gas prices could rise as much as 25 cents per gallon because of the storm, AAA said supplies remain high and demand has been reduced by the storm. Diesel fuel rose less than two cents, to $2.56 a gallon.

"Yeah, they take advantage of people".

The average price of regular in Texas today is $2.25, up four cents from yesterday and 11 cents higher than before Harvey hit.

"If everyone goes to the bank at the same time and tries to get their money, then it causes a panic and the bank doesn't have enough cash in the drawer to give everyone their money then".

"I think we would be very comfortable tapping into that and providing that alleviated resource", homeland security adviser Tom Bossert said as quoted by Reuters. SC and Washington, D.C., are above $2.62 per gallon.

That compares with an average of about 500,000 tonnes of gasoline exported e week from Europe to the United States and Latin America.