Hurricane Maria Brings 155 MPH Winds To Puerto Rico

  • Hurricane Maria Brings 155 MPH Winds To Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria Brings 155 MPH Winds To Puerto Rico

Electricity supply to more than 1 million customers of Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority was affected after Irma, and more than 45,000 homes and businesses are still without power.

Maria's 255 kilometer per hour winds had already roared into the eastern Caribbean island of Dominica on Tuesday, with official communications to the island completely cut off in the wake of the storm.

The hurricane center warned of a unsafe storm surge of 6-9 feet in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The storm ripped off the roofs of houses as it pummeled the island as an extremely risky Category 5 storm, according to The National Hurricane Center.

Beth Tamplin Jones, 45, rode out Hurricane Irma earlier this month in the pantry of a friend's house on St. John in the US Virgin Islands. It poses a threat to several islands already devastated by Hurricane Irma.

Maria was about 15 miles west of Arecibo, Puerto Rico, moving northwest at 12 mph at 2 p.m. and about 95 miles east of Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. However, Iris's family and many other islanders plan to ride out the storm in their homes.

Puerto Rico began evacuations yesterday in preparation for the storm. Then it's expected to turn north after Puerto Rico - away from Florida.

"This is going to be an extremely violent phenomenon", Governor Ricardo Rossello said.

A new major hurricane is barreling straight toward Puerto Rico, and it is getting stronger by the hour.

"This is an extremely, extremely risky hurricane", USVI Gov. Kenneth Mapp warned Tuesday, adding that the area would see storm surges of six to nine feet and up to 20 inches of rain. At that central pressure, Maria would rank among the 10 most-intense landfalling hurricanes in the Atlantic basin in the last 150 years.

The hurricane center warned that much rain could cause flooding and mudslides.

North of Dominica, Hurricane Maria also hit the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe hard. And while that seems like a lot, it's happened before. And more storms can certainly form. They tweet in both Spanish and English.